About Edie and Racer eX

Edie Thys Morgan is a freelance writer, author, two-time Olympian and mother of two living in Etna, New Hampshire.

The skiing story:
When three older siblings tried to ditch their little sister at every opportunity on the slopes of Squaw Valley, CA, a downhiller was born. I spent eight years as a member of the US Ski Team, competed in two Olympics (1988, 1992), three World Championships (1987, ’89, ’91), and was ranked among the top ten DH and Super G skiers in the world.

The rest of the story: After calling it quits in 1993, I finished up my college degree close to home at Sierra Nevada College, then took a job in New York City with SKI magazine for “just one year, I promise.” True love intervened and I’m still an east coaster, raising a family in New Hampshire.

I can’t get away from skiing, nor do I try. When not at our day jobs, my husband Chan and I coach our  two kids and the next gen, in the Ford Sayre racing program. We test gear for SKI and try to get out—in the Sierra Nevada, the Tetons, the Rockies the Wasatch, the Sawtooths the Green and White Mountains, etc—as much as possible.

 

About Racer eX

I retired like most athletes—tired and bitter, glad for the experience yet wishing I had done more. That first autumn, not going to the glaciers or to torturous dryland training camps, and suddenly spending my time sitting in a classroom, I found myself with plenty of time to reflect. So when Gary Black, publisher of Ski Racing, suggested I write an article about my new perspective I jumped at the opportunity, and a few hours later Racer-eX was born.

The overwhelming response from Racers eX to that first article indicated I had connected with a like-minded community of athletes and struck a vein of rich material. Racer eX became a regular column in Ski Racing and later in SKI.

Racer eX is my pen name, and an identity I share with every athlete who has dedicated himself or herself completely to be the best at anything. However, you don’t need an athletic background to understand and appreciate the dynamics that fuel the eX-er community. The “glory days,” are often retold, but the meat of the sports experience lies in the untold story—the part of most careers that never gets told. When my teammates reminisce, it’s not about the wins or losses. It’s about all the space between.